Help Me Choose

Find the right water treatment solution for your whole home needs. Start by selecting your location, your water treatment source, household size, and water quality issues. We will recommend the right range of products for your unique needs.

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1. Your Location

Your location will be used to recommend water treatment dealers in your vicinity.




2. Water treatment need
Water treatment needed for:
3. Water source
Water source is:
Understanding the source of your water will help determine the types of contaminants that are likely to be encountered.
4. Maximum flow rate
The water usage rate (or flow rate) determines the size of equipment needed to adequately treat your water without impacting water pressure in the building. If you do not know the water usage rate, the size of the dwelling can provide a reasonable estimate for this value.
5. Quality concerns
Select your Water Quality concerns: (select all that apply)
Microbiological contaminants are usually only detectable with a water quality test. You cannot see, smell or taste microbial contaminants. These may include coliforms, e.coli, Cryptosporidium, Giardia and viruses.
Excessive turbidity, or cloudiness, in drinking water is aesthetically unappealing, and may also represent a health concern.
Municipalities use chlorine in various chemical forms to disinfect water at the source. Often times the residual chlorine in the water supply produces an objectionable taste or odour at the tap.
Iron and manganese are commonly found in groundwater and can pose an aesthetic issue for well-owners as the water will stain fixtures and clothing. These minerals can also interfere with the proper functioning of a UV system and should be minimized for optimal water disinfection.
An ideal water supply is free of any discoloration.
Hardness minerals (Ca2+, Mg2+) can deposit in pipes and appliances, leave a scum on the bathtub and reduce lather from soaps and detergents. All costing you more money in the long run. In addition, hard water negatively impacts the effectiveness of UV disinfection.
6. UV system requirements
Certified or Validated (NSF or EPA) UV system required?
In many jurisdictions, campgrounds, churches and other public venues are considered “small drinking water systems” as they are places where the public can get drinking water. In these circumstances, any water supply that is not municipally supplied will need to be disinfected. The regulations are likely to specify a certified or validated UV system. These UV systems have been tested by a third-party against strict criteria as set out by USEPA or NSF.
7. UV dose
What UV dose is required?
UV dose is a measure of the amount of UV light intensity delivered to the water in the UV system per unit flow – often expressed in mJ/cm2. The typical dose required for light commercial and regulated facilities is 40 mJ/cm2.
Defaults to 30 mJ/cm2
8. Minimum UVT
What is the minimum UVT?
UV transmittance (UVT) is a measure of a substance’s ability to allow UV light to transmit through it. This can vary significantly depending on the source water and is a critical factor in ensuring UV disinfection efficiency.
Defaults to 85% - 94%
3. Water source
Water source is:
Understanding the source of your water will help determine the types of contaminants that are likely to be encountered.
4. Dwelling size or water usage

Selecting from one group will disable the other group.

Please select Dwelling Size:
OR
Select Water Usage Rate:
The water usage rate (or flow rate) determines the size of equipment needed to adequately treat your water without impacting water pressure in the building. If you do not know the water usage rate, the size of the dwelling can provide a reasonable estimate for this value.
5. Quality concerns
Select your Water Quality concerns: (select all that apply)
Microbiological contaminants are usually only detectable with a water quality test. You cannot see, smell or taste microbial contaminants. These may include coliforms, e.coli, Cryptosporidium, Giardia and viruses.
Excessive turbidity, or cloudiness, in drinking water is aesthetically unappealing, and may also represent a health concern.
Municipalities use chlorine in various chemical forms to disinfect water at the source. Often times the residual chlorine in the water supply produces an objectionable taste or odour at the tap.
Iron and manganese are commonly found in groundwater and can pose an aesthetic issue for well-owners as the water will stain fixtures and clothing. These minerals can also interfere with the proper functioning of a UV system and should be minimized for optimal water disinfection.
An ideal water supply is free of any discoloration.
Hardness minerals (Ca2+, Mg2+) can deposit in pipes and appliances, leave a scum on the bathtub and reduce lather from soaps and detergents. All costing you more money in the long run. In addition, hard water negatively impacts the effectiveness of UV disinfection.